A proposal to solve the problems of Black Folk using the UN Universal Periodic Review of the USA

We spoke today at State department for the #BlackFolksPlan

January 27th – We attended and presented the enclosed document at the US Government consultation with civil society.

The U.S. Department of State cordially invites you to participate in a discussion regarding the United States of America’s Universal Periodic Review on Monday, January 27, 2020 from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Harry S. Truman Building of the State Department. The Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor’s Acting Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Scott Busby will host the discussion. Plan to arrive no later than 1:15 p.m. due to security screening procedures.

Anyone who would like to ask a question or make a comment to indicate that, as well as the subject of your question or comment, when you submit your RSVP. Questions or comments will be limited to two minutes.

This consultation is off the record and closed to the press.

The African Diaspora Directorate is looking to create a public private partnership with US State Department based on statements and actions of the President and our submission to Third Cycle of the United Nations Universal Periodic Review of the United States with this statement:

The African Diaspora Directorate, its affiliates, members and co-founders Sons and Daughters of Africa, the African American Agriculturalist Association, the Black Wall Street Cooperative, the Universal Negro Improvement Association & African Communities League and Friends of the African Union believe that executive action by the United States Government of a Federal Reserve Quantitative Easing based debt purchasing program (The Daniels IDIQ), in a public private partnership, that can be a solution for the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of African people enslaved in chattel slavery in the United States of America, from 1789 to 1866, as well as the progenitors to the United States of America, the 13 British colonies between 1619 to 1789.

It will also address the damage incurred by past & current federal government racism against freed African Slaves in the United States of America from 1863 to 1868 and subsequently de jure and de facto of institutionalized systematic racial and economic discrimination against American citizens of African Heritage from 1868 to 2019. It will be a stimulus to the American Economy that:

(1) is judicious & addresses solutions to lead poisoning in 7M domestic dwellings;

(2) answers under the control of our Federal Executive Branch to the statements in the inter-agency response set forth by the US State Department to the United Nations Universal Periodic Review of the USA in 2015 that said “Civil Rights, Ethnic, & Racial Discrimination” is the number one human rights problem of the country;

(3) can draw on already established Executive Authority by the US State Department with no action needed by Congress and can be executed by May 1st, 2020;

helps the other American citizens through indirect associations by the creation of supportive ancillary jobs, entrepreneurial opportunities and sustainable economic growth thereby supporting the advancement of the American people as a whole, and;

(5) is just adequate enough to implement real changes that reverse long-standing conditions caused by systemic de jure and de facto of racial and economic discrimination, as documented in depth elsewhere, that provides a means from 2020 to 2095 to address these issues with a 75-year capital trust to do so based on a updated to third cycle Daniels IDIQ and the $150B in current bank based community benefit agreements in place that were driven by the Community Reinvestment Act.

File name : Pess-Release-of-the-African-Diaspora-Directorate-on-the-UNUPR-3rd-cycle-2.pdf

AfDiDi Announces Major African American Economic Impact Plan for Philadelphia

PRESS RELEASE:  January 14th, 2020 

CONTACT: Stanley Crawford / BMCCP (215) 275-4015 stanleycrawford6@gmail.com

THE BLACK MALE COMMUNITY COUNCIL OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES MAJOR AFRICAN AMERICAN ECONOMIC IMPACT TO PHILADELPHIA

THE BLACK FOLKS PLAN FOR PHILADELPHIA” A MULTI-BIILION DOLLAR GRASSROOTS INITIATIVE

On Thursday January 16, 2020 at 12:00 Noon EST at the Guardian Civic League, 1516 W. Girard Ave. The Black Male Community Council of Philadelphia (BMCCP) in conjunction with The Friends of the African Union (FAU) and the African Diaspora Directorate (@AfDiDi2063) will announce “The Black Folks Plan for Philadelphia” a Multi-Billion grassroots initiative that will have a direct impact on Real Estate, development, Employment, Human Service, and Culture in the City of Philadelphia.

The Black Male Community Counsel of Philadelphia (BMCCP) was selected by the FAU to organize African American grassroot non-profits and for-profits projects to be founding members of what is now “The Philadelphia smartWISE Project Coalition”, a co-sponsor of The Black Folks Plan for Philadelphia which is be known online as the #BlackFolksPlanfoPhiladelphia. BMCCP has gained a track record of Boots on the Ground, All Hands on Deck efforts for the betterment and upliftment of the Black Community.  It is now joined in these efforts by FAU and the African Diaspora Directorate.

The African Diaspora Directorate (www.AfricanDiasporaDirectorate.org), a member of the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC), along with Friends of the African Union, will use the newly approved on Dec 7th 2019 $60B Truist Bank Community Benefit Agreement “CBA” to focus, through The Black Folks Plan for Philadelphia, on the needs of Black Folk and allies in Philadelphia. Together we will create  within The Black Folks Plan for Philadelphia a plan of action to mobilize this CBA in 2020.

The largest to date NCRC led CBA is a three-year $60 billion agreement for the region served by Truist Financial Corporation, which includes Philadelphia.  The combined company to be created through the merger started operations with over $450B in assets and is the 6th largest bank in the USA. Truist committed $31 billion towards specific home purchase lending to people of color and LMI Communities. It dedicated $7.8 billion in lending to small businesses with annual revenue of less than $1 million, $17.2 billion to Community Development loans and $3.48 billion to Community Development Investments. 

Truist also pledged $120 million for CRA-qualified grants. In addition to the monetary obligations of the agreement, Truist pledged to open 15 new branches in LMI Neighborhoods and Communities of color and to create a Signature Capacity Building program with a focus on Racial Equity and Economic Mobility. Truist will to strive to spend 10% of their third-party vendor spending on diverse suppliers. Lastly, Truist committed to creating a Community Advisory Board in collaboration with NCRC. 

“Banks have an important role to play in our Communities, and these Community Benefits Agreements help ensure they fulfill that role for everyone, including low- and moderate-income Communities and Communities of Color,” said John Taylor, President and CEO of the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC), the driving force behind the recent proliferation of bank CBAs.

Since 2016, NCRC has facilitated the creation of CBAs worth nearly $150 billion with these Banking Groups: KeyBank in March 2016 for $16.5 billion; Huntington Bancshares in May 2016 for $16.1 billion; Fifth Third Bank in November 2016 for $30 billion; First Financial Bank in October 2017 for $1.7 billion; Santander Bank in November 2017 for $11 billion; IBERIABANK in November 2017 for $6.7 billion; First Tennessee Bank in April 2018 for $4 billion; Wells Fargo & Company (DC) in October 2018 for $1.6 billion; Fifth Third updated agreement in October 2018 for an additional $2 billion; and, the latest with BB&T and Suntrust in July 2019 for $60 billion.  

Our operations in Philadelphia including The Philadelphia smartWISE Project Coalition and FAU Philadelphia will be joining NCRC this year.  Together we plan to leverage the Trusit CBA to benefit the people of Philadelphia through the creation of the Friends of the African Union smartWISE Community Reinvestment Coalition of greater Philadelphia to reach out beyond just the 600,000 black folk in the city. The FAU smartWISE Community Reinvestment Coalition Model will use technology and branding labeled smartWISE, which is inclusive of “wisdom based” or “Wise” models. The FAU smartWISE business model is meant to collect unfathomable amounts of data through FAU Philadelphia Chapter memberships, but also do so at the speed of digital Cloud. Then, and very importantly, data can then be mined to allow the next step of decisions and action based on this “Wise” technology. FAU smartWISE is based on a vision, in Philadelphia, of the future that believes that the exponential growth of hardware and a secure “Internet of Things” that can surpass the non-exponential growth capabilities of the human mind.  This then will be incorporated into the Black Folks Plan for Philadelphia.

We do this work using the Cross-Cutting Topics Covered in the FAU smartWISE Community Reinvestment Coalition model that works with the African Diaspora Directorate to create representation for People of African Descent in Pennsylvania, in the United Nations, in the African Union and other international forums. A example of this is creating the FAU Pennsylvania Assembly Black Family Reunion:

###

A $60B Bank based community benefit agreement

The African Diaspora Directorate and its Co-Founder plans to take advantage for itself and members of a three-year, $60 billion community benefits plan for the region served by Truist Financial Corporation

The three-year, $60 billion plan, based upon discussions between the banks that formed Truist (BB&T Corporation and SunTrust Banks, Inc.), the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC)  and its community-based members, like t he African Diaspora Directorate, will increase financial resources for low- and moderate-income (LMI) communities across the eastern United States.

The plan’s specific goals include:

  • $31 billion for home purchase mortgage loans to LMI borrowers, LMI geographies, minority borrowers and/or majority-minority geographies
  • $7.8 billion for lending to small businesses, to support the growth of businesses with revenues less than $1 million.
  • $17.2 billion in Community Development Lending (CDL) supporting affordable housing development, small business growth and lending to nonprofits that support the LMI community
  • $3.6 billion in Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) Qualified Investments and Philanthropy, of which $120 million will be designated for CRA-qualified philanthropic giving

The plan was developed through direct participation in six input and listening sessions held in urban and rural communities throughout the bank service areas, as well as input from participants in the regulator-hosted public meetings. It focuses on affordable housing and small business development, economic stability and mobility, workforce development and public safety.

Participants of the Community Benefits Plan announcement. Leaders from NCRC, BB&T, SunTrust and community organizations attended the $60 billion community benefits plan announced July 16, 2019, in Charlotte, North Carolina.

“Many bank mergers proceed without any detail on how communities will benefit from the combination,” said NCRC CEO Jesse Van Tol. “However, BB&T and SunTrust showed tremendous leadership by participating in a collaborative process with NCRC and our community-based member organizations to establish the largest-to-date community benefits plan. This plan spells out a substantive and detailed commitment of loans, investments and services to LMI people and neighborhoods across 17 states and the District of Columbia.”

Under the plan, the banks also committed to opening at least 15 new branches in LMI and/or minority communities and to work with a community advisory board made up of representatives from community organizations that work within LMI neighborhoods, to provide updates on the progress of the plan. Truist will work with NCRC to mutually identify proposed members of the Community Advisory Board.

“This plan will provide a much-needed influx of investment into critical programs that improve affordable housing, mortgage lending, small business development and economic development projects to LMI people and communities across most of the eastern half of the country,” said NCRC President and Founder John Taylor. “We very much appreciate the strong collaboration demonstrated by the executive leadership of BB&T and SunTrust banks, as well as the critical role our members played in our discussions with the banks.”

In February 2019, BB&T and SunTrust announced a proposed merger that would result in the sixth-largest U.S. commercial bank based on assets and deposits. The merger is expected to close in the third or fourth quarter of 2019, subject to customary closing conditions, including regulatory approvals and approval of both companies’ shareholders.

Since 2016, NCRC has negotiated community benefits plans with seven banking groups for lending, investments and philanthropy worth a combined $150 billion in the communities served by the banks.

“The Community Benefits Plan exemplifies what Truist will stand for and how it will support local communities in the years to come,” said BB&T Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Kelly S. King (Current Chairman and CEO of Truist Financial), . “Both BB&T and SunTrust have a long legacy of serving the community, but together as Truist we will be uniquely positioned to invest in ways we never could on our own. We are committed to building growing, diverse and vibrant neighborhoods in the regions where we work and live.”

“Truist is creating the premier financial institution to serve the diverse needs of our clients and communities, and this plan is an initial stake in the ground as to our values and commitments. Our legacy companies share a strong history of being more than members of the communities we serve, but also partners in developing affordable housing, promoting financial literacy, and promoting access to critical programs and services. Today’s announcement is a reflection of that history and a look ahead at what we can collectively achieve as one combined institution,” said SunTrust Chairman and Chief Executive Officer William H. Rogers, Jr. (Current president and chief operating officer of Truist Financial Corporation)

AfDiDi and FAU in Philadelphia

Date: December 9th 2019

To: The Black Male Community Council of Philadelphia (BMCCP)

FROM: Friends of the African Union

On behalf of the FAU this letter of intent is to inform the BMCCP and their designated affiliates of our plans of “The Black Folks Plan Project”. A comprehensive project with four action items that will create a major paradigm shift for people of African descent.

 Action Items:

  1. Real Estate Development with a comprehensive Community Benefit Agreement
  2. Human Service
  3. Culture
  4. Participation in a united Civil Society Organization, the African Diaspora Directorate, as the sixth region of the African Union and in the United Nations and other international organizations such as the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and or the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

The FAU is targeting Philadelphia as a pilot project for a national model, see DRAFT enclosure, and is working with BMCCP to identify qualified organizations and projects that can meet our criteria. The concept, history, process and resources are indicated in the documents accompanying this letter.

My team and I look forward to meeting with you on Thursday 12/19/19 at 11:00 am; the meeting is being hosted by BMCCP at a location of their choosing.

Sincerely

Hershel Daniels Junior

Chairman of Friends of the African Union

Phone: 01.513.858.5275

fauchairman@friendsoftheafricanunion.com

AfDiDi General Assembly Agenda January 18th 2020

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Agenda Items – Noon to 6pm EST

  • Background & Introduction to the African Diaspora Directorate
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Sons and Daughters of Africa (SADA)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Friends of the African Union (FAU)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA/ACL)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is the Black Wall Street Co-Operative (SADA)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is African American (SADA)
  • The African Diaspora Directorate Operations
  • African Diaspora Directorate and the 2016 #BlackFolksPlan
  • African Diaspora Directorate and a #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica
  • Reparations for American African Slavery
  • Followup to the establishment of operations in Pennsylvania
  • African Diaspora Directorate and American Reparations as implemented in Pennsylvania.
  • The African Diaspora Directorate now takes up implementation of this action as a updated #BlackFolksPlanforPhiladelphia
  • The African Diaspora Directorate now takes up implementation of a action plan for Women and Girls as a updated #BlackFolksPlan
  • The African Diaspora Directorate now takes up implementation of a AfDiDi model for the creation of a brand new United Nations Chapter of the United Nations Association of the United States of America with the Friends of the African Union in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Agenda Background & Introduction to the African Diaspora Directorate

On behalf of the African Diaspora Directorate (“Directorate”), I, Dr. Kofi Agyapong have the honor to present you some background first, Brotherhood and Sisterhood International Inc., a 30 year old (1989) American Non Profit Organization, EIN 52-1569388 with a 501c3 Ruling in 1989, in order to form a more perfect union between the people of the African Union and the United States of America, establish justice and the rule of law equally applied to all people, ensure global tranquility, provide for the common defense of the people of the African Diaspora, promote the general welfare for the people of the African Diaspora, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, did ordain as a American Civil Society Organization ran by citizens of the African Union and those of the African Diaspora living in the United States of America did this past Juneteenth (June 19th 2019) did join with other organizations in the creation of the African Diaspora Directorate as our global civil society organization for people of the African Diaspora.

The African Diaspora Directorate is a new Civil Society Organization designed to serve as a catalyst to facilitate the involvement of African Diasporan peoples and organizations around the world in the affairs of the Africa Union and to develop solutions for them in the countries in which they live.

The AfDiDi Logo

In a world characterized by increasing mobility and interconnections, the People of the African diasporas have assumed a new importance in the African Union, the United Nations and in the United States of America, as of January 8th 2018, an official history from 1619. The African Diaspora may be divided into two categories:

(i) people of African heritage who “involuntarily” were migrated to North America, Europe, the Caribbean, Brazil, Latin America, Arab Lands, Oceania, etc.; and,

(ii) persons who recently, from 1919, left the African continent “voluntarily”.

We accept and operate in the African Continent under the recognition of the African Diaspora globally and legally by the 55 African member states of African continental organization the African Union (AU) which is based on the AU Executive Council meeting in its 7th Ordinary Session in Sirte in June/July 2005, by Decision EX.CL/Dec.221(VII),  which adopted the following definition of the Diaspora: “The African Diaspora consists of peoples of African origin living outside the continent, irrespective of their citizenship and nationality and who are willing to contribute to the development of the continent and the building of the African Union“.

This 2020 action is based on The 400 Years of African-American History Commission Act (1619-2019). A law signed into law January 8, 2018, by President Trump, which established a commission to coordinate the 400th anniversary year of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in the English colonies. This law was based on for the first time the US federal government recognizing by law that on August 25th, 1619, 20 Africans were brought to Point Comfort in the English colony of Virginia, which later became one of the founding states of the USA. We do not know if they were enslaved or indentured. We do know that now after 400 years we are organizing to take control of our future from a headquarters in Washington DC..

The African Diaspora Directorate Operations

The African Diaspora Directorate (Directorate) is an economic, social, humanitarian, charitable, educational, membership, and advocacy global civil-society organization of a American Non Profit 501C3 (1989) Brotherhood and Sisterhood (BSI) Inc. founded to work for the benefit of the People the African Diaspora and their host countries. 

As of November 28th 2019 the African Diaspora Directorate has seven divisions: 

(1) a General Assembly with three operational chambers: a People’s Congress, a Civil Society Organizational Congress and an Assembly of State Leaders;

(2) a Secretariat is to be established in the USA by August 25th, 2019 under management by Friends of the African Union through 2024; 

(3) The African Diaspora Royal Society which is governed by the The African Diaspora Directorate Royal Council. The Society is a membership of those of African Tribal Royalty in the global African Diaspora, the tribe in Ghana created for those in the global African Diaspora without a tribe, African Tribal Royalty that welcome members of the African Diaspora in them and or tribes recognized by them for the members of the African Diaspora;

(4) a Civil Society Division will work with the African Union’s (AU) Citizens and Diaspora Directorate (AU/CIDO) to implement the AU’s engagement process with non-state actors through the involvement of the African Diaspora’s Civil Society through AU/CIDO;

(5) a Diaspora Division will organize at national in the African Diaspora, regional and or state geographic and Tribal level the people of African Descent in the global African Diaspora which is composed of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in line with AU’s Economic, Social and Cultural Council, the United Nations, the European Union, Organization of American States along with other international and or multinational organizations; 

(6) a Operations Division who will create and operate the partnerships and businesses called for by the organs of the African Diaspora Directorate Secretariat; and,

(7) The Business Operations Division shall create business corporations organized for profit with a corporate purpose of creating general public benefit for the People of the African Diaspora (PAD). These benefit corporations offer PAD entrepreneurs and investors the option to build, and invest in, businesses that operate in a socially and environmentally responsible manner.

African Diaspora Directorate and a #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica

Our ideology is that of “a Global Plan of Action made Local” which rejects a fundamental adherence to left- or right-wing politics or policies, instead requiring the adoption of such policies as correspond to the problems faced by the nation at any given moment through the lens of the history and needs of the 47m People of African Descent in the global African Diaspora living in the USA. Thus both right- and left-wing policies may be considered equally carefully in formulation of the policy of the African Diaspora Directorate in the creation of its Community Benefit Agreement for people of African Descent in the #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica.

The #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica is to be a solution based on our work presented by one of our co-founders Friends of the African Union (FAU) to the Addis Agenda which provided a new global framework for financing sustainable development, which supports implementation of the 2030 Agenda, including the SDGs.

The African Diaspora Directorate Operational Bureaus

1.On behalf of the African Diaspora Directorate (“Directorate”), I, Dr. Kofi Agyapong, Chairman of the Directorate, have the honor to present you some background first, Brotherhood and Sisterhood (BSI) International (Blacks and Whites Uniting Communities) a 30 year old (1989) American Non-Profit Organization, EIN 52-1569388 with a 501c3 Ruling in 1989, in order to form a more perfect union between the people of the African Union and the United States of America, establish justice and the rule of law equally applied to all people, ensure global tranquility, provide for the common defense of the people of the African Diaspora, promote the general welfare for the people of the African Diaspora, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, did ordain as an American Civil Society Organization ran by citizens of the African Union and those of the African Diaspora living in the United States of America did this past Juneteenth (June 19th 2019) did join with Friends of the African Union in the creation of the African Diaspora Directorate as a global civil society organization for people of the African Diaspora. By our estimate they number of 300M worldwide, 47M in the USA.
Definition of the African Diaspora
2.In a world characterized by increasing mobility and interconnectedness, the People of the African diasporas have assumed a new importance in the African Union, the United Nations and in the United States of America, as of January 8th 2018, an official history from 1619. The African Diaspora may be divided into two categories:
3.(i) people of African heritage who “involuntarily” were migrated to North America, Europe, the Caribbean, Brazil, Latin America, Arab Lands, Oceania, etc.; and,
4.(ii) persons who recently, from 1919, left the African continent “voluntarily”.
5.We accept and operate in the African Continent under the recognition of the African Diaspora globally and legally by the 55 African member states of African continental organization the African Union (AU) which is based on the AU Executive Council meeting in its 7th Ordinary Session in Sirte in June/July 2005, by Decision EX.CL/Dec.221(VII),  which adopted the following definition of the Diaspora: “The African Diaspora consists of peoples of African origin living outside the continent, irrespective of their citizenship and nationality and who are willing to contribute to the development of the continent and the building of the African Union”.
Background
6.This 2019 action is based on the 400 Years of African-American History Commission Act. A law signed into law January 8, 2018, by President Trump, which established a commission to coordinate the 400th anniversary year of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in the English colonies. This law was based on for the first time the US federal government recognizing by law that on August 25th,1619, 20 Africans were brought to Point Comfort in the English colony of Virginia, which later became one of the founding states of the USA. We do not know if they were enslaved or indentured. We do know that now after 400 years we are organizing to take control of our future from a headquarters in Washington DC..
7.The founders of the.African Diaspora Directorate recognizes that becoming Americans did not create economic opportunity, rather the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this year in the practice of institutionalized racism on Americans of African Descent. We now have not only the tools to change the narrative but the collective experience and expertise to do so. Working with Washington DC we can set an example for the nation.
The African Diaspora Directorate Operations
8.As of December 30th 2019 the African Diaspora Directorate has seven divisions:
9.(1) a General Assembly with three operational chambers: a People’s Congress, a Civil Society Organizational Congress and an Assembly of State Leaders;
10.(2) a Secretariat is to be established in the USA by August 25th, 2019 under management by Friends of the African Union through 2024;
11.(3) The African Diaspora Royal Society which is governed by the The African Diaspora Directorate Royal Council. The Society is a membership of those of African Tribal Royalty in the global African Diaspora, the tribe in Ghana created for those in the global African Diaspora without a tribe, African Tribal Royalty that welcome members of the African Diaspora in them and or tribes recognized by them for the members of the African Diaspora;
12.(4) a Civil Society Division will work with the African Union’s (AU) Citizens and Diaspora Directorate (AU/CIDO) to implement the AU’s engagement process with non-state actors through the involvement of the African Diaspora’s Civil Society through AU/CIDO;
13.(5) a Diaspora Bureau will organize at national in the African Diaspora, regional and or state geographic and Tribal level the people of African Descent in the global African Diaspora which is composed of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in line with AU’s Economic, Social and Cultural Council, the United Nations, the European Union, Organization of American States along with other international and or multinational organizations;
14.(6) a Operations Bureau who will create and operate the partnerships and businesses called for by the organs of the African Diaspora Directorate Secretariat; and,
15.(7) The Business Operations Bureau shall create business corporations organized for profit with a corporate purpose of creating general public benefit for the People of the African Diaspora (PAD). These benefit corporations offer PAD entrepreneurs and investors the option to build, and invest in, businesses that operate in a socially and environmentally responsible manner. 

A Secretariat was to be established in the USA by August 25th, 2019 under management by Friends of the African Union through 2024. These are the African Diaspora Directorate Secretariat’s working committees:

  1. The African Diaspora Directorate Strategy Council
  2. The African Diaspora Directorate Council of Leaders
  3. The African Diaspora Directorate Community Council
  4. The African Diaspora Directorate Permanent CSO Representatives
  5. The African Diaspora Economic Council
  6. The African Diaspora Directorate Business Council
  7. The African Diaspora Forum on Indigenous Issues
  8. The African Diaspora Directorate Justice Council
  9. The African Diaspora Directorate Royal Council
  10. The African Diaspora Directorate Municipal Council
  11. The African Diaspora Human Rights Council
  12. The African Diaspora Cultural Council
  13. The African Diaspora Gender Issues Council
  14. The African Diaspora Peace Council
  15. The African Diaspora Security Council
  16. The African Diaspora Directorate Council of Elders
  17. The African Diaspora Directorate Veterans Council
  18. The African Diaspora Food and Agriculture Council
  19. The African Diaspora STEM and Environmental Council
  20. The African Diaspora Rural Economy and Infrastructure Council
  21. The African Diaspora Urban Council
  22. The African Diaspora Public Safety Council
  23. The African Diaspora Poverty Council
  24. The African Diaspora Health Council
  25. The African Diaspora Sustainable Cities and Communities Council
  26. The African Diaspora Migration Council
  27. The African Diaspora Energy Council
  28. The African Diaspora Status of Women Council
  29. The African Diaspora Children’s Council
  30. The African Diaspora Social Affairs and Family Issues Council
  31. The African Diaspora Labour Council
  32. The African Diaspora Housing Council
  33. The African Diaspora People with Disabilities Council
  34. The African Diaspora Human Resources
  35. The African Diaspora Re-Entry Issues Council
  36. The African Diaspora Educational Council
  37. The African Diaspora African Economic Affairs Council
  38. The African Diaspora Infrastructure Council
  39. The African Diaspora Environmental Council
  40. The African Diaspora Maritime Council
  41. The African Diaspora Life Below Water Council
  42. The African Diaspora Land Council
  43. The African Diaspora Sustainable Development Council
  44. The African Diaspora Intellectual Property Council
  45. The African Diaspora Library and Information Services Council
  46. The African Diaspora Social Media and Communications Council
  47. The African Diaspora Trade and Industry Council
  48. The African Diaspora Transportation Council
  49. The African Diaspora Global Tourism Council
  50. The African Diaspora Global Sports Council
  51. The African Diaspora Global Recreation Council
  52. The African Diaspora Global Entertainment Council
  53. The African Diaspora Aerospace and Airline Council
  54. The African Diaspora Space Agency
  55. The African Dollar Foundation 
  56. Partnerships for the African Diaspora
  57. The African Diaspora Development Cooperation Council
  58. The African Diaspora Community Reinvestment Council (ADCRC)
  59. The African Diaspora Development Fund
  60. The African Diaspora Finance Corporation 
  61. The African Diaspora Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency
  62. The African Diaspora Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes
  63. The African Diaspora Bank for Reconstruction and Development
  64. The African Diaspora Cross-Cutting Programmes and Task Forces Management Agency
  65. The African Diaspora Directorate African Union Commission Civil Society Council
  66. The African Diaspora Economic Community of West African States Civil Society Forum (ECOWAS-ADCSF)
  67. The African Diaspora Southern African Development Community Civil Society Forum (SADC-ADCSF)
  68. The African Diaspora East African Community Civil Society Forum (EAC-ADCSF) 
  69. The African Diaspora Arab Maghreb Union Civil Society Forum (UMA-ADCSF)
  70. The African Diaspora Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa Civil Society Forum (COMESA-ADCSF)
  71. The African Diaspora Community of Sahel-Saharan States Civil Society Forum (CEN-SAD-ADCSF)
  72. The African Diaspora Economic Community of Central African States Civil Society Forum (ECCAS-ADCSF)
  73. The African Diaspora Directorate Community  
  74. The African Diaspora Directorate United Nations Civil Society Council

HDj Updated It: 1/16/2020

The African Diaspora Directorate is a new Civil Society Organization designed to serve as a catalyst to facilitate the involvement of African Diasporan peoples and organizations around the world in the affairs of the Africa Union and to develop solutions for them in the countries in which they live through these seven Divisions with members being able to serve on one of the African Diaspora Directorate Secretariat’s working councils and or committees.

All Friends of the African Union Members are able to do this as part of their membership.

AfDiDi General Assembly Agenda February 1st 2020

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Agenda Items – Noon to 2pm EST

  • Background & Introduction to the African Diaspora Directorate
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Sons and Daughters of Africa (SADA)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Friends of the African Union (FAU)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA/ACL)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is the Black Wall Street Co-Operative (SADA)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is African American (SADA)
  • The African Diaspora Directorate Operations
  • African Diaspora Directorate and the 2016 #BlackFolksPlan
  • African Diaspora Directorate and a #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica
  • Reparations for American African Slavery
  • African Diaspora Directorate and American Reparations
  • The African Diaspora Directorate now takes up implementation of this action as a updated #BlackFolksPlan

Agenda Background & Introduction to the African Diaspora Directorate

On behalf of the African Diaspora Directorate (“Directorate”), I, Dr. Kofi Agyapong have the honor to present you some background first, Brotherhood and Sisterhood International Inc., a 30 year old (1989) American Non Profit Organization, EIN 52-1569388 with a 501c3 Ruling in 1989, in order to form a more perfect union between the people of the African Union and the United States of America, establish justice and the rule of law equally applied to all people, ensure global tranquility, provide for the common defense of the people of the African Diaspora, promote the general welfare for the people of the African Diaspora, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, did ordain as a American Civil Society Organization ran by citizens of the African Union and those of the African Diaspora living in the United States of America did this past Juneteenth (June 19th 2019) did join with other organizations in the creation of the African Diaspora Directorate as our global civil society organization for people of the African Diaspora.

The African Diaspora Directorate is a new Civil Society Organization designed to serve as a catalyst to facilitate the involvement of African Diasporan peoples and organizations around the world in the affairs of the Africa Union and to develop solutions for them in the countries in which they live.

The AfDiDi Logo

In a world characterized by increasing mobility and interconnections, the People of the African diasporas have assumed a new importance in the African Union, the United Nations and in the United States of America, as of January 8th 2018, an official history from 1619. The African Diaspora may be divided into two categories:

(i) people of African heritage who “involuntarily” were migrated to North America, Europe, the Caribbean, Brazil, Latin America, Arab Lands, Oceania, etc.; and,

(ii) persons who recently, from 1919, left the African continent “voluntarily”.

We accept and operate in the African Continent under the recognition of the African Diaspora globally and legally by the 55 African member states of African continental organization the African Union (AU) which is based on the AU Executive Council meeting in its 7th Ordinary Session in Sirte in June/July 2005, by Decision EX.CL/Dec.221(VII),  which adopted the following definition of the Diaspora: “The African Diaspora consists of peoples of African origin living outside the continent, irrespective of their citizenship and nationality and who are willing to contribute to the development of the continent and the building of the African Union“.

This 2020 action is based on The 400 Years of African-American History Commission Act (1619-2019). A law signed into law January 8, 2018, by President Trump, which established a commission to coordinate the 400th anniversary year of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in the English colonies. This law was based on for the first time the US federal government recognizing by law that on August 25th, 1619, 20 Africans were brought to Point Comfort in the English colony of Virginia, which later became one of the founding states of the USA. We do not know if they were enslaved or indentured. We do know that now after 400 years we are organizing to take control of our future from a headquarters in Washington DC..

The African Diaspora Directorate Operations

The African Diaspora Directorate (Directorate) is an economic, social, humanitarian, charitable, educational, membership, and advocacy global civil-society organization of a American Non Profit 501C3 (1989) Brotherhood and Sisterhood (BSI) Inc. founded to work for the benefit of the People the African Diaspora and their host countries. 

As of November 28th 2019 the African Diaspora Directorate has seven divisions: 

(1) a General Assembly with three operational chambers: a People’s Congress, a Civil Society Organizational Congress and an Assembly of State Leaders;

(2) a Secretariat is to be established in the USA by August 25th, 2019 under management by Friends of the African Union through 2024; 

(3) The African Diaspora Royal Society which is governed by the The African Diaspora Directorate Royal Council. The Society is a membership of those of African Tribal Royalty in the global African Diaspora, the tribe in Ghana created for those in the global African Diaspora without a tribe, African Tribal Royalty that welcome members of the African Diaspora in them and or tribes recognized by them for the members of the African Diaspora;

(4) a Civil Society Division will work with the African Union’s (AU) Citizens and Diaspora Directorate (AU/CIDO) to implement the AU’s engagement process with non-state actors through the involvement of the African Diaspora’s Civil Society through AU/CIDO;

(5) a Diaspora Division will organize at national in the African Diaspora, regional and or state geographic and Tribal level the people of African Descent in the global African Diaspora which is composed of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in line with AU’s Economic, Social and Cultural Council, the United Nations, the European Union, Organization of American States along with other international and or multinational organizations; 

(6) a Operations Division who will create and operate the partnerships and businesses called for by the organs of the African Diaspora Directorate Secretariat; and,

(7) The Business Operations Division shall create business corporations organized for profit with a corporate purpose of creating general public benefit for the People of the African Diaspora (PAD). These benefit corporations offer PAD entrepreneurs and investors the option to build, and invest in, businesses that operate in a socially and environmentally responsible manner.

African Diaspora Directorate and a #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica

Our ideology is that of “a Global Plan of Action made Local” which rejects a fundamental adherence to left- or right-wing politics or policies, instead requiring the adoption of such policies as correspond to the problems faced by the nation at any given moment through the lens of the history and needs of the 47m People of African Descent in the global African Diaspora living in the USA. Thus both right- and left-wing policies may be considered equally carefully in formulation of the policy of the African Diaspora Directorate in the creation of its Community Benefit Agreement for people of African Descent in the #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica.

The #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica is to be a solution based on our work presented by one of our co-founders Friends of the African Union (FAU) to the Addis Agenda which provided a new global framework for financing sustainable development, which supports implementation of the 2030 Agenda, including the SDGs.

The Addis Agenda aligns all domestic and international resource flows, policies and international agreements with economic, social and environmental priorities. It incorporates all the SDG means of implementation targets into a comprehensive financing framework, and serves as a guide for further actions by governments, international organizations, the business sector, civil society, and philanthropists.

The Financing for Development process is centered around supporting the follow-up to the agreements and commitments reached during the three major international conferences on Financing for Development: in Monterrey, Mexico in 2002; in Doha, Qatar in 2008; and in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 2015. The process also follows up on the financing for development-related aspects of the outcomes of major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic and social fields, including the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Reparations for American African Slavery

The Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent in 2017 based on their 2016 Investigation of the United States. They provided in their report solutions to the practice of institutionalized racism in government and business on the descendant Americans of African heritage from 1868 through today and as important solutions through Community Benefit Agreements to the effects subsequently de jure & de facto of that racial & economic discrimination. 

File name : G1618330.pdf

Ms. Fanon-Mendes is the daughter of Frantz Fanon and Director of the Frantz Fanon Foundation and was the expert Chairwoman of the Working group on People of African Descent when it visited the USA at the invitation of the Obama Adminstration

Friends of the African Union submitted to the WGEPAD and the UN Human Rights Council our $5T Solution to America Reparations

FAU did so still believing that Obama Administration executive action on a $5T USD Quantitative Easing debt purchasing program called the #BlackFolksPlan that used The Daniels IDIQ (under license) would be a solution for the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of 76 years African slavery in the USA and its effects subsequently de jure and de facto of racial and economic discrimination on the descendant Americans of African heritage. In 2016, after spending two years in negotiating the terms of implementation of solutions to the 2015 Universal Periodic Review (#UNUPR) of the USA, the US Government never acted on their request.

Background: Accounting for inflation, if we use the $20,000 that the Japanese received for 3 years in Concentration camps (1942 to 1945), then we would be asking for funding at $901,838.17 or about Nine Hundred Thousand Dollars per person (1789 to 1865). If applied to the 4.4M Africans in 1865, as our co-founder Friends of the African Union did not use the end of the civil war August 1866, rather the year of the end of major combat operations. 1865, with the surrender of the Army of Northern VA, then the amount is $3,968,087,948,098.35 or about $4T, but if it is to be paid on the descendants of those Africans, who numbered over 36M in 2016 (US Census), then the amount is $32,466,174,120,804.70 ($32.5T).

Note: We had asked for $5T with over a Trillion going back to the US Government for purchasing the US Postal Service $455B (to support a million black businesses that would have been financed on this model with a new distribution system to challenge established market makers), paying for over 10M acres of land and other agreements that supported the reeducation of our people including buying their college debt.

The African Diaspora Directorate now takes up implementation of this action as a updated #BlackFolksPlan

Now in 2020 that national 2016 #BlackFolksPlan then becomes shaped by members of the African Diaspora Directorate to a plan #BlackFolksPlanfor(name of Country here) that concerns itself with how to allocate the power inherent in our Community Benefit Agreements to do trade with that country and to what ends they should be used to address the needs of the People of African Descent in the global African Diaspora living in the USA and their descendants. This all happens under a agreement with AU/CIDO and or the AU organ of the direction of the Chairman.

AfDiDi General Assembly Agenda January 4th 2020

meet.google.com/cew-ifgm-pyb
 
‪+1 443-461-5489‬ PIN: ‪438 468‬#

Agenda Items

  • Background & Introduction to the African Diaspora Directorate
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Sons and Daughters of Africa (SADA)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Friends of the African Union (FAU)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA/ACL)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is the Black Wall Street Co-Operative (SADA)
  • Co-Founder of AfDiDi is African American (SADA)
  • The African Diaspora Directorate Operations
  • African Diaspora Directorate and the 2016 #BlackFolksPlan
  • African Diaspora Directorate and a #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica
  • Reparations for American African Slavery
  • African Diaspora Directorate and American Reparations
  • The African Diaspora Directorate now takes up implementation of this action as a updated #BlackFolksPlan

Agenda Background & Introduction to the African Diaspora Directorate

On behalf of the African Diaspora Directorate (“Directorate”), I, Dr. Kofi Agyapong have the honor to present you some background first, Brotherhood and Sisterhood International Inc., a 30 year old (1989) American Non Profit Organization, EIN 52-1569388 with a 501c3 Ruling in 1989, in order to form a more perfect union between the people of the African Union and the United States of America, establish justice and the rule of law equally applied to all people, ensure global tranquility, provide for the common defense of the people of the African Diaspora, promote the general welfare for the people of the African Diaspora, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, did ordain as a American Civil Society Organization ran by citizens of the African Union and those of the African Diaspora living in the United States of America did this past Juneteenth (June 19th 2019) did join with other organizations in the creation of the African Diaspora Directorate as our global civil society organization for people of the African Diaspora.

The African Diaspora Directorate is a new Civil Society Organization designed to serve as a catalyst to facilitate the involvement of African Diasporan peoples and organizations around the world in the affairs of the Africa Union and to develop solutions for them in the countries in which they live.

The AfDiDi Logo

In a world characterized by increasing mobility and interconnections, the People of the African diasporas have assumed a new importance in the African Union, the United Nations and in the United States of America, as of January 8th 2018, an official history from 1619. The African Diaspora may be divided into two categories:

(i) people of African heritage who “involuntarily” were migrated to North America, Europe, the Caribbean, Brazil, Latin America, Arab Lands, Oceania, etc.; and,

(ii) persons who recently, from 1919, left the African continent “voluntarily”.

We accept and operate in the African Continent under the recognition of the African Diaspora globally and legally by the 55 African member states of African continental organization the African Union (AU) which is based on the AU Executive Council meeting in its 7th Ordinary Session in Sirte in June/July 2005, by Decision EX.CL/Dec.221(VII),  which adopted the following definition of the Diaspora: “The African Diaspora consists of peoples of African origin living outside the continent, irrespective of their citizenship and nationality and who are willing to contribute to the development of the continent and the building of the African Union“.

This 2020 action is based on The 400 Years of African-American History Commission Act (1619-2019). A law signed into law January 8, 2018, by President Trump, which established a commission to coordinate the 400th anniversary year of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in the English colonies. This law was based on for the first time the US federal government recognizing by law that on August 25th, 1619, 20 Africans were brought to Point Comfort in the English colony of Virginia, which later became one of the founding states of the USA. We do not know if they were enslaved or indentured. We do know that now after 400 years we are organizing to take control of our future from a headquarters in Washington DC..

The African Diaspora Directorate Operations

The African Diaspora Directorate (Directorate) is an economic, social, humanitarian, charitable, educational, membership, and advocacy global civil-society organization of a American Non Profit 501C3 (1989) Brotherhood and Sisterhood (BSI) Inc. founded to work for the benefit of the People the African Diaspora and their host countries. 

As of November 28th 2019 the African Diaspora Directorate has seven divisions: 

(1) a General Assembly with three operational chambers: a People’s Congress, a Civil Society Organizational Congress and an Assembly of State Leaders;

(2) a Secretariat is to be established in the USA by August 25th, 2019 under management by Friends of the African Union through 2024; 

(3) The African Diaspora Royal Society which is governed by the The African Diaspora Directorate Royal Council. The Society is a membership of those of African Tribal Royalty in the global African Diaspora, the tribe in Ghana created for those in the global African Diaspora without a tribe, African Tribal Royalty that welcome members of the African Diaspora in them and or tribes recognized by them for the members of the African Diaspora;

(4) a Civil Society Division will work with the African Union’s (AU) Citizens and Diaspora Directorate (AU/CIDO) to implement the AU’s engagement process with non-state actors through the involvement of the African Diaspora’s Civil Society through AU/CIDO;

(5) a Diaspora Division will organize at national in the African Diaspora, regional and or state geographic and Tribal level the people of African Descent in the global African Diaspora which is composed of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in line with AU’s Economic, Social and Cultural Council, the United Nations, the European Union, Organization of American States along with other international and or multinational organizations; 

(6) a Operations Division who will create and operate the partnerships and businesses called for by the organs of the African Diaspora Directorate Secretariat; and,

(7) The Business Operations Division shall create business corporations organized for profit with a corporate purpose of creating general public benefit for the People of the African Diaspora (PAD). These benefit corporations offer PAD entrepreneurs and investors the option to build, and invest in, businesses that operate in a socially and environmentally responsible manner.

African Diaspora Directorate and a #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica

Our ideology is that of “a Global Plan of Action made Local” which rejects a fundamental adherence to left- or right-wing politics or policies, instead requiring the adoption of such policies as correspond to the problems faced by the nation at any given moment through the lens of the history and needs of the 47m People of African Descent in the global African Diaspora living in the USA. Thus both right- and left-wing policies may be considered equally carefully in formulation of the policy of the African Diaspora Directorate in the creation of its Community Benefit Agreement for people of African Descent in the #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica.

The #BlackFolksPlanforAfrica is to be a solution based on our work presented by one of our co-founders Friends of the African Union (FAU) to the Addis Agenda which provided a new global framework for financing sustainable development, which supports implementation of the 2030 Agenda, including the SDGs.

The Addis Agenda aligns all domestic and international resource flows, policies and international agreements with economic, social and environmental priorities. It incorporates all the SDG means of implementation targets into a comprehensive financing framework, and serves as a guide for further actions by governments, international organizations, the business sector, civil society, and philanthropists.

The Financing for Development process is centered around supporting the follow-up to the agreements and commitments reached during the three major international conferences on Financing for Development: in Monterrey, Mexico in 2002; in Doha, Qatar in 2008; and in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 2015. The process also follows up on the financing for development-related aspects of the outcomes of major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic and social fields, including the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Reparations for American African Slavery

The Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent in 2017 based on their 2016 Investigation of the United States. They provided in their report solutions to the practice of institutionalized racism in government and business on the descendant Americans of African heritage from 1868 through today and as important solutions through Community Benefit Agreements to the effects subsequently de jure & de facto of that racial & economic discrimination. 

File name : G1618330.pdf

Ms. Fanon-Mendes is the daughter of Frantz Fanon and Director of the Frantz Fanon Foundation and was the expert Chairwoman of the Working group on People of African Descent when it visited the USA at the invitation of the Obama Adminstration

Friends of the African Union submitted to the WGEPAD and the UN Human Rights Council our $5T Solution to America Reparations

FAU did so still believing that Obama Administration executive action on a $5T USD Quantitative Easing debt purchasing program called the #BlackFolksPlan that used The Daniels IDIQ (under license) would be a solution for the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of 76 years African slavery in the USA and its effects subsequently de jure and de facto of racial and economic discrimination on the descendant Americans of African heritage. In 2016, after spending two years in negotiating the terms of implementation of solutions to the 2015 Universal Periodic Review (#UNUPR) of the USA, the US Government never acted on their request.

Background: Accounting for inflation, if we use the $20,000 that the Japanese received for 3 years in Concentration camps (1942 to 1945), then we would be asking for funding at $901,838.17 or about Nine Hundred Thousand Dollars per person (1789 to 1865). If applied to the 4.4M Africans in 1865, as our co-founder Friends of the African Union did not use the end of the civil war August 1866, rather the year of the end of major combat operations. 1865, with the surrender of the Army of Northern VA, then the amount is $3,968,087,948,098.35 or about $4T, but if it is to be paid on the descendants of those Africans, who numbered over 36M in 2016 (US Census), then the amount is $32,466,174,120,804.70 ($32.5T).

Note: We had asked for $5T with over a Trillion going back to the US Government for purchasing the US Postal Service $455B (to support a million black businesses that would have been financed on this model with a new distribution system to challenge established market makers), paying for over 10M acres of land and other agreements that supported the reeducation of our people including buying their college debt.

The African Diaspora Directorate now takes up implementation of this action as a updated #BlackFolksPlan

Now in 2020 that national 2016 #BlackFolksPlan then becomes shaped by members of the African Diaspora Directorate to a plan #BlackFolksPlanfor(name of Country here) that concerns itself with how to allocate the power inherent in our Community Benefit Agreements to do trade with that country and to what ends they should be used to address the needs of the People of African Descent in the global African Diaspora living in the USA and their descendants. This all happens under a agreement with AU/CIDO and or the AU organ of the direction of the Chairman.

Event – 400 Years of African-American History Commemoration Aug 25th 2019

Event – 400 Years of African-American History Commemoration Aug 25th 2019

Countdown Clock

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Overseer Artayou Carrier whipped me. I was two months in bed sore from the whipping. My master come after I was whipped; he discharged the overseer. The very words of poor Peter, taken as he sat for his picture. Baton Rouge, La., April 2, 1863. (War Dept.) NARA FILE #: 165-JT-230 WAR & CONFLICT BOOK #: 109
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